1950’s Ladies Gloves

In the early 1950’s, ladies were required to wear gloves as etiquette and as part of fashion. They wore gloves that match their shoes or their outfit, while some ladies wore traditional white gloves. Fashionable ladies would wear striped gloves or patterned with matching scarves. Not only fashionable, gloves were also worn to warm hands.

1950s Glove advertisement

The 1950’s glove etiquette for ladies was that gloves had to be worn in most public places, including the streets of cities and large towns, at church, to a luncheon or dinner, reception, a dance, theatre, restaurant, wedding and any official function. Smart ladies wore gloves on trains, buses and trams.

When wearing formal wear, ladies needed to wear elbow-length gloves. This made a person look fashionable and glamorous.

Everyday gloves were not fancy or piped or in contrasting colours. Ladies kept everyday gloves very simple, like all the basics in their wardrobe.

Brides had to keep their hands covered. A bride wearing short sleeves had to wear long gloves but had to slip her hand out easily for the wedding ring.

Bracelets could be worn over gloves but never rings.

Marilyn wearing bracelets over her gloves

Some ladies wore leather gloves. They could be deerskin or cowhide. For warmth some wore theirs lined with sheepskin but this meant the gloves looked bulkier.

Ladies wearing their gloves

A lady only removed her gloves before eating, drinking, smoking, playing cards or putting on makeup. Long gloves remained on at all times at dances. Gloves even remained on when shaking someones hands. At a restaurant, a lady removed her coat, then was seated and could only then remove her gloves.

To me, I think gloves are very stylish and I love to wear them at formal outings to match my vintage outfit. What do you think of gloves? Stylish or not? Let me know your thoughts.

Back soon……

Ridiculously Retro Xx

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